April 15, 2017

POETRY MONTH! CELEBRATING FEMALE LATINA POETS!



Poetry is like a song, like a psalm, like a prayer. 
Poetry is different things to many people, and April being Poetry Month,
The Latina Book Club is celebrating by featuring Latino poets all week long.


There are numerous Latina female poets on which we could spend a whole month, if not more, discussing so I'll just stick with the immediate ones on my shelves and a quick snapshot of their books.  Happy Reading!





RISING, FALLING, ALL OF US by Thelma Reyna (Golden Foothills Press)
From the Pope to immigrants to lovers to soldiers to celebrities to the mentally ill – all are examined and judged in Dr. Reyna’s poetry collection. The former Poet Laureate of the Altadena Library District has been published in numerous journals, and is now the proud founder and owner of the small indie press, Golden Foothills Press. Learn more about Thelma and Golden Foothills Press at www.goldenfoothillspress.com.


IT CONCERNS THE MADNESS by Nancy Mercado (Long Shot Productions)
Mercado breaks up her “table of conscience” into four parts—In Memoriam, In Love, Incensed and In Time. The poems are short and long, sweet and sad, about home and loneliness, about madness and nonsense. Visit her at www.nancy-mercado.com.


A TONGUE IN THE MOUTH OF THE DYING by Laurie Ann Guerrero (University of Notre Dame Press)
Both personal and distant, Guerrero’s poems are compelling with vivid images and powerful word choices. A lot of the poems are dedicated to family and friends, but readers too can connect to them. Visit her at http://www.laurieannguerrero.com/.


CODEX OF JOURNEYS: BENDITO CAMINO by Liliana Valenzuela 
(Mouthfeel Press)
A member of the Macondo Writers Workshop, Valenzuela poetry is lyrical and lush, and both a battle cry and a celebration. We also love that the collections contains poems in both Spanish and English. Visit her at http://www.lilianavalenzuela.com.


WITH THE RIVER ON OUR FACE by Emmy Pérez (University of Arizona Press)
“Language can be so sexy.” Pérez’ poetry flows, ebbs and floods readers with emotion, just like the currents of the Rio Grande. She talks politics, community, walls, immigration, culture, roots. Learn more about her at www.emmyperez.com.


THIS RIVER HERE by Carmen Tafolla (Wings Press)
First Poet Laureate of San Antonio, Tafolla honors her hometown with a collection of poems about family, culture, community and generations of history. Readers will also enjoy the photographs and illustrations within. Learn more about Tafolla at www.carmentafolla.com.





READ LATINO LIT!

READ LATINO POETRY!